William F. Morris, Professor  

William F. Morris

Bill Morris studies the population ecology of plants and insects (both herbivores and pollinators). Current projects include: the population dynamic consequences of constitutive and inducible resistance in plants, the maintenance of mutualistic interactions between flowering plants and nectar-robbing pollinators, the use of population-level attributes to detect biotic responses to ongoing environmental changes, and the use of mathematical models to assess viability of threatened and endangered populations. The common thread uniting these projects is that they combine field experiments and mathematical models to study population dynamics in natural and managed systems.

Education:
Ph.D., University of Washington, 1990
B.S., Cornell University, 1983

Office Location: 104 Bio Sci Bldg, Durham, NC 27708
Office Phone: (919) 684-5257
Email Address: wfmorris@duke.edu

Specialties:
Ecology and Population Biology

Research Categories: Population ecology, mutualism, plant-insect interations, life-history adaptations to stochastic environments, theoretical ecology, conservation ecology

Research Description: Bill Morris studies the population ecology of plants and insects (both herbivores and pollinators). Current projects include: the population dynamic consequences of constitutive and inducible resistance in plants, the maintenance of mutualistic interactions between flowering plants and nectar-robbing pollinators, the use of population-level attributes to detect biotic responses to ongoing environmental changes, and the use of mathematical models to assess viability of threatened and endangered populations. The common thread uniting these projects is that they combine field experiments and mathematical models to study population dynamics in natural and managed systems.

Recent Publications   (More Publications)   (search)

  1. Waddle, E; Piedrahita, LR; Hall, ES; Kendziorski, G; Morris, WF; Peterson, ML; Doak, DF, Asynchrony in individual and subpopulation fecundity stabilizes reproductive output of an alpine plant population., Ecology, vol. 100 no. 4 (April, 2019), pp. e02639 [doi]  [abs].
  2. Peterson, ML; Doak, DF; Morris, WF, Incorporating local adaptation into forecasts of species' distribution and abundance under climate change., Global Change Biology, vol. 25 no. 3 (March, 2019), pp. 775-793 [doi]  [abs].
  3. Villellas, J; GarcĂ­a, MB; Morris, WF, Geographic location, local environment, and individual size mediate the effects of climate warming and neighbors on a benefactor plant., Oecologia, vol. 189 no. 1 (January, 2019), pp. 243-253 [doi]  [abs].
  4. Peterson, ML; Doak, DF; Morris, WF, Both life-history plasticity and local adaptation will shape range-wide responses to climate warming in the tundra plant Silene acaulis., Global Change Biology, vol. 24 no. 4 (April, 2018), pp. 1614-1625 [doi]  [abs].
  5. Himes Boor, GK; Schultz, CB; Crone, EE; Morris, WF, Mechanism matters: the cause of fluctuations in boom-bust populations governs optimal habitat restoration strategy., Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America, vol. 28 no. 2 (March, 2018), pp. 356-372 [doi]  [abs].

Curriculum Vitae