William F. Morris, Professor  

William F. Morris

Bill Morris studies the population ecology of plants and insects (both herbivores and pollinators). Current projects include: the population dynamic consequences of constitutive and inducible resistance in plants, the maintenance of mutualistic interactions between flowering plants and nectar-robbing pollinators, the use of population-level attributes to detect biotic responses to ongoing environmental changes, and the use of mathematical models to assess viability of threatened and endangered populations. The common thread uniting these projects is that they combine field experiments and mathematical models to study population dynamics in natural and managed systems.

Education:
Ph.D., University of Washington, 1990
B.S., Cornell University, 1983

Office Location: 254 Biological Sciences Building
Office Phone: (919) 684-5257
Email Address: wfmorris@duke.edu

Specialties:
Ecology and Population Biology

Research Categories: Population ecology, mutualism, plant-insect interations, life-history adaptations to stochastic environments, theoretical ecology, conservation ecology

Research Description: Bill Morris studies the population ecology of plants and insects (both herbivores and pollinators). Current projects include: the population dynamic consequences of constitutive and inducible resistance in plants, the maintenance of mutualistic interactions between flowering plants and nectar-robbing pollinators, the use of population-level attributes to detect biotic responses to ongoing environmental changes, and the use of mathematical models to assess viability of threatened and endangered populations. The common thread uniting these projects is that they combine field experiments and mathematical models to study population dynamics in natural and managed systems.

Recent Publications   (More Publications)   (search)

  1. Campos, FA; Morris, WF; Alberts, SC; Altmann, J; Brockman, DK; Cords, M; Pusey, A; Stoinski, TS; Strier, KB; Fedigan, LM, Does climate variability influence the demography of wild primates? Evidence from long-term life-history data in seven species., Global Change Biology (June, 2017) [doi]  [abs].
  2. Canelles, Q; Saura-Mas, S; Brotons, L; García, MB; Lloret, F; Villellas, J; Morris, WF, Environmental stress effects on reproduction and sexual dimorphism in the gynodioecious species Silene acaulis, Environmental and Experimental Botany (June, 2017) [doi] .
  3. Vázquez, DP; Gianoli, E; Morris, WF; Bozinovic, F, Ecological and evolutionary impacts of changing climatic variability., Biological Reviews, vol. 92 no. 1 (February, 2017), pp. 22-42 [doi]  [abs].
  4. Sivakoff, FS; Morris, WF; Aschehoug, ET; Hudgens, BR; Haddad, NM, Habitat restoration alters adult butterfly morphology and potential fecundity through effects on host plant quality, Ecosphere, vol. 7 no. 11 (November, 2016), pp. e01522-e01522 [doi] .
  5. Aschero, V; Morris, WF; Vázquez, DP; Alvarez, JA; Villagra, PE, Demography and population growth rate of the tree Prosopis flexuosa with contrasting grazing regimes in the Central Monte Desert, Forest Ecology and Management, vol. 369 (June, 2016), pp. 184-190 [doi] .

Curriculum Vitae