William F. Morris, Professor  

William F. Morris

Bill Morris studies the population ecology of plants and insects (both herbivores and pollinators). Current projects include: the population dynamic consequences of constitutive and inducible resistance in plants, the maintenance of mutualistic interactions between flowering plants and nectar-robbing pollinators, the use of population-level attributes to detect biotic responses to ongoing environmental changes, and the use of mathematical models to assess viability of threatened and endangered populations. The common thread uniting these projects is that they combine field experiments and mathematical models to study population dynamics in natural and managed systems.

Education:
Ph.D., University of Washington, 1990
B.S., Cornell University, 1983

Office Location: 104 Bio Sci Bldg, Durham, NC 27708
Office Phone: (919) 525-4585
Email Address: wfmorris@duke.edu

Specialties:
Ecology and Population Biology

Research Categories: Population ecology, mutualism, plant-insect interations, life-history adaptations to stochastic environments, theoretical ecology, conservation ecology

Research Description: Bill Morris studies the population ecology of plants and insects (both herbivores and pollinators). Current projects include: the population dynamic consequences of constitutive and inducible resistance in plants, the maintenance of mutualistic interactions between flowering plants and nectar-robbing pollinators, the use of population-level attributes to detect biotic responses to ongoing environmental changes, and the use of mathematical models to assess viability of threatened and endangered populations. The common thread uniting these projects is that they combine field experiments and mathematical models to study population dynamics in natural and managed systems.

Recent Publications   (More Publications)   (search)

  1. Reed, PB; Bridgham, SD; Pfeifer-Meister, LE; DeMarche, ML; Johnson, BR; Roy, BA; Bailes, GT; Nelson, AA; Morris, WF; Doak, DF, Climate warming threatens the persistence of a community of disturbance-adapted native annual plants., Ecology, vol. 102 no. 10 (October, 2021), pp. e03464 [doi]  [abs].
  2. Louthan, AM; Walters, JR; Terando, AJ; Garcia, V; Morris, WF, Shifting correlations among multiple aspects of weather complicate predicting future demography of a threatened species, Ecosphere, vol. 12 no. 9 (September, 2021) [doi]  [abs].
  3. Doak, DF; Waddle, E; Langendorf, RE; Louthan, AM; Isabelle Chardon, N; Dibner, RR; Keinath, DA; Lombardi, E; Steenbock, C; Shriver, RK; Linares, C; BegoƱa Garcia, M; Funk, WC; Fitzpatrick, SW; Morris, WF; Peterson, ML, A critical comparison of integral projection and matrix projection models for demographic analysis, Ecological Monographs, vol. 91 no. 2 (May, 2021) [doi]  [abs].
  4. Peterson, ML; Bailes, G; Hendricks, LB; Pfeifer-Meister, L; Reed, PB; Bridgham, SD; Johnson, BR; Shriver, R; Waddle, E; Wroton, H; Doak, DF; Roy, BA; Morris, WF, Latitudinal gradients in population growth do not reflect demographic responses to climate., Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America, vol. 31 no. 2 (March, 2021), pp. e2242 [doi]  [abs].
  5. Reed, PB; Peterson, ML; Pfeifer-Meister, LE; Morris, WF; Doak, DF; Roy, BA; Johnson, BR; Bailes, GT; Nelson, AA; Bridgham, SD, Climate manipulations differentially affect plant population dynamics within versus beyond northern range limits, Journal of Ecology, vol. 109 no. 2 (February, 2021), pp. 664-675 [doi]  [abs].

Curriculum Vitae